Category Archives: Juneberry

Expect the 2013 crop of juneberries to be a good one in Ann Arbor

That's the word from Ann Arbor Chronicle contributor Linda Diane Feldt:

Service berries (aka June berries) appear to be on schedule. They taste like blueberries. Very edible. They will be ripe in two to three weeks [from May 23, 2013]. 

That puts a projected juneberry first picking date at about June 7, after the peonies start but before the u-pick strawberries are ready.

More details on the Arborwiki Juneberries page.

Advertisements

Juneberry season is on its way – trees are in bloom

Ben from Damn Arbor notes that the juneberries in town are in bloom, which means that it shouldn't be more than about a month before they are ready for street-side snacking. 

The forager in me always welcomes street trees that provide impromptu nutrition. Arborwiki has a brief list of some of the places where you can find juneberries downtown; surprisingly, the municipal parking lots on the west side of downtown are ringed with these trees. Keep your eyes open and get to them before the birds do.

Walking Around: bonus points

I walked a lot more today than I normally would have walked, thanks to my new game Walking Around. Here's some of the bonus points I scored that I wouldn't have scored in my previous quest, Sitting Around Typing.

Pedestrian Path (+1). It's always good to find a way to get from here to there that's not on any map. The pedestrian path I found connects Needham Road to Amelia Place. I've added that little segment to Open Street Map so that I can find it again, and so that I can cut through one more neighborhood with confidence. My son and I took this route to his summer camp today, and he suggested one more point for Unfamiliar Route (+1).

Picture 3

Unexpected Lunch Companions (+2). If you wait for the bus at a bus stop near a restaurant, and if someone you know happens to be driving to that restaurant, then not only can you have an unexpectedly pleasant lunch but you can also get a ride downtown. Thanks to the Toziers for the happy coincidence and for a beginning of a discussion of annexation and township islands.

Picture 4

Urban Foraging (+1). Juneberries are in season, which means that a carefully selected path will take you past some delicious snacks, right out there in the open, where thousands of people walk each day but none notice except the birds and a few brave souls who appreciate Amalanchier. For more berrypicking ideas, I follow Linda Diane Feldt's @wildcrafting Twitter account. For lots more detail on Amalanchier, the 1946 American Species of Amalachier has ranges and keys for native species.

Picture 5

Park Benches (+2). If, at the end of your trek, you stop to wait for the bus – then it's useful to note that sometimes the bus stop is close to a park which has a park bench in the shade. Douglas Park is a nice place to wait for the #4, especially if you have RideTrak running on your cell phone to tell you when to get up and walk to the stop 1/2 block south of the park. My walk the next morning circled around all the way back to this park bench.

North Star (+1). A nice night walk on a clear night gives you all of the directions you need when Polaris is visible in the north sky. The drawing is from H. A. Rey's The Stars, my all time favorite book about the night sky.

Picture 6

 

How do I come up with this bonus point structure? If you walk around enough, something that you see or do is bound to make you happy. Give yourself points for those happy places, and know where they are so that you can revisit them.

the farmer’s market report, day 7

day 7 of a continuing series documenting my new job at annarbor.com

There's a wonderful weekly program on KCRW in Santa Monica called Good Food.  Host Evan Kleiman does a roundup of reporting from the restaurants and farmers markets around Los Angeles, with interviews with restaurant owners, talks with farmers at markets about the produce they are bringing to market this week, and feature stories about restaurant excursions into the many cuisines that make up LA.  It's a very fun show, and especially when it's the middle of an Ann Arbor winter there's something sunny and cheery about hearing that something is in season somewhere.

I went to the Wednesday market at the Ann Arbor Farmers Market today.  It's about six blocks from the office, and for a number of years I've been a regular there, either at the Wednesday or the Saturday market.  I came with pencil and pad of paper in hand and no shopping basket and walked around looking at what was there, and what caught my eye was berries – lots of berries – really, the high season of the berry season.  So to provide a proper catalog, here's what's in season at market this week:

  • Strawberries.  Nearing the end of the season.
  • Blueberries.  Just starting the season.
  • Gooseberries, red and green.  One vendor, Wasem's.
  • Currants, red and black, also both at Wasem's.
  • Blackberries.
  • Mulberries.  I was surprised to see them, because I think of them as street tree food, but they were there.
  • Red Raspberries, both conventional and organic.
  • Cherries, sweet, sour, and Queen Anne.  I've taken a taste to the sour cherries – more flavor and less sweet.

I might have missed black raspberries; they are ripe in bushes around town, including at Wheeler Park and Wurster Park.  The juneberry / serviceberry season is either over or just about over depending on the tree you go to.   Molly Notarianni, the market manager, says she saw wild gooseberries along a path around Pickerel Lake, near the stone fireplaces.

Amelanchier (Shadbush, Juneberry, Sugar Plum) inventory for Ann Arbor, 2009

Here's a complete list of where all of the Amelanchier (juneberry, shadbush, sugar plum depending on where you are from) trees are on the public streets in Ann Arbor.  The complete inventory shows 356 trees, each geocoded; rather than try to pin them on a map, this is by street name in alphabetical order, with quite a bit of duplicates eliminated.

The whole program to do this is

grep -i Amelanchier trees09.csv | awk -F, '{ print $3, "between", $4, "and " $5}' | sort | uniq > juneberry.txt

where the trees09.csv file is downloadable from the Ann Arbor Chronicle who originally sourced this data from the city of Ann Arbor; see their story about it here.

Alas this post is a little bit too late for this season; by July 2, 2009, many of the juneberry trees are completely ripe, so get picking.

ABBOTT AVE between MONTGOMERY AVE and S REVENA BLVD
ALLMENDINGER PARK between ALLMENDINGER PARK and ALLMENDINGER PARK
ANTIETAM DR between CUL DE SAC and LEXINGTON DR
ANTIETAM DR between LEXINGTON DR and CUL DE SAC
ARBANA DR between W HURON ST and MARK HANNAH PL
ARBOR OAKS PARK between ARBOR OAKS PARK and ARBOR OAKS PARK
ARBORDALE ST between W STADIUM BLVD and EVELYN CT
ARDMOOR AVE between CUL DE SAC and MARTHA AVE
ARDMOOR AVE between MARTHA AVE and CUL DE SAC
ASCOT RD between CHAUCER DR and CHAUCER DR
BADER PARK between BADER PARK and BADER PARK
BANDEMER PARK between BANDEMER PARK and BANDEMER PARK
BARDSTOWN TRL between LARCHMONT DR and MIDDLETON DR
BIRD RD between NEWPORT CREEK DR and W HURON RIVER DR
BIRK AVE between PAULINE BLVD and SNYDER AVE
BLAIN CT between CUL DE SAC and SHADOWOOD DR
BRANDYWINE DR between GALLWAY CT and PACKARD RD
BRIAN CT between CUL DE SAC and MEADOWSIDE DR
BRIARCLIFF ST between PRAIRIE ST and AURORA ST
BROOKS ST between MIXTWOOD RD and MILLER AVE
BROOKSIDE PARK between BROOKSIDE PARK and BROOKSIDE PARK
BUHR PARK between BUHR PARK and BUHR PARK
CAMBRIDGE RD between DAY ST and HILL ST
CATHERINE ST between N FOURTH AVE and N FIFTH AVE
CATHERINE ST between N INGALLS ST and GLEN AVE
CHARLES ST between BROOKRIDGE RD and DANIEL ST
CHAUCER DR between SCIO CHURCH RD and WEMBLEY CT
CHERRY ST between SPRING ST and FOUNTAIN ST
COLONY RD between ESSEX RD and PACKARD RD
COLUMBIA AVE between KIMBERLEY RD and DEAD END
CORONADA DR between LAS VEGAS DR and ALHAMBRA DR
CRANBROOK PARK between CRANBROOK PARK and CRANBROOK PARK
CREEKBEND CT between CUL DE SAC and MEADOWSIDE DR
CRESTLAND DR between HALL AVE and CARHART AVE
CUMBERLAND AVE between HAMPSHIRE RD and CANTERBURY RD
DEVONSHIRE RD between ARLINGTON BLVD and AVON RD
DHU VARREN RD between LESLIE PARK CIR and OMLESAAD DR
DHU VARREN RD between PONTIAC TRL and LESLIE PARK CIR
DONEGAL CT between BRANDYWINE DR and CUL DE SAC
DOUGLAS PARK between DOUGLAS PARK and DOUGLAS PARK
DUNDEE DR between DEAD END and MOREHEAD DR
E ANN ST between N STATE ST and N DIVISION ST
E KINGSLEY ST between DETROIT ST and N DIVISION ST
E LIBERTY ST between S DIVISION ST and S FIFTH AVE
EDDY ST between DEAD END and VERLE AVE
ELI DR between YOST BLVD and LILLIAN RD
ELLSWORTH PARK between ELLSWORTH PARK and ELLSWORTH PARK
EMILY CT between CUL DE SAC and MEADOWSIDE DR
ESCH AVE between PAGE AVE and PINE VALLEY BLVD
FALCON CT between HICKORY POINT DR and CUL DE SAC
FARMERS MARKET between FARMERS MARKET and FARMERS MARKET
FERNDALE PL between HENRY ST and GARDNER AVE
FIFTH ST between W DAVIS AVE and W MADISON ST
FIFTH ST between W JEFFERSON ST and W LIBERTY ST
FIFTH ST between W LIBERTY ST and W JEFFERSON ST
FOUNTAIN ST between W SUMMIT ST and SUNSET RD
FOURTH ST between W LIBERTY ST and W JEFFERSON ST
FRANKLIN BLVD between SNYDER AVE and BIRK AVE
FULLER PARK between FULLER PARK and FULLER PARK
FULLER RD between CEDAR BEND DR and MAIDEN LN
FURSTENBURG NATURE AREA between FURSTENBURG NATURE AREA and FURSTENBURG NATURE AREA
GALLUP PARK between GALLUP PARK and GALLUP PARK
GEDDES AVE between OSWEGO ST and ONONDAGA ST
GEDDES AVE between S HURON PKWY and RIVERVIEW DR
GEORGETOWN BLVD between YORKTOWN DR and YORKTOWN DR
GLAZIER WAY between WOLVERHAMPTON LN and HURON PKWY
GLENWOOD ST between DEXTER AVE and VALLEY DR
GOTT ST between PEARL ST and W SUMMIT ST
GOTT ST between W SUMMIT ST and HISCOCK ST
GRACE ST between WESTWOOD AVE and ALICE ST
GREEN RD between WATERSHED DR and FOX HUNT DR
HAISLEY DR between N MAPLE RD and CARBECK DR
HAZELWOOD AVE between CENTRAL AVE and SUNNYWOOD DR
HEMLOCK DR between CHAMPAGNE DR and SHADOWOOD DR
HEMLOCK DR between SHADOWOOD DR and PLAINVIEW CT
HENRY ST between FERNDALE PL and WESTMINSTER PL
HEWETT DR between REDEEMER AVE and RUSSETT RD
HICKORY POINT DR between OTTER CREEK CT and BIRCHWOOD CT
HILL ST between GREENE ST and S DIVISION ST
HILLDALE DR between BREDE PL and DELAFIELD DR
HOLYOKE LN between NEWPORT RD and LOWELL RD
HUNTINGTON PL between ONAWAY PL and HUNTINGTON DR
HURON HIGHLANDS PARK between HURON HIGHLANDS PARK and HURON HIGHLANDS PARK
INDEPENDENCE BLVD between JAMES ST and VICTORIA AVE
IROQUOIS PARK between IROQUOIS PARK and IROQUOIS PARK
JONES DR between PLYMOUTH RD and BROADWAY ST
KELLY PARK between KELLY PARK and KELLY PARK
KEMPF HOUSE between KEMPF HOUSE and KEMPF HOUSE
KIRTLAND DR between GLEN LEVEN RD and W STADIUM BLVD
LAKEVIEW AVE between W LIBERTY RD and DEAD END
LAWTON PARK between LAWTON PARK and LAWTON PARK
LENNOX ST between CUL DE SAC and ARBORDALE ST
LESLIE SCIENCE CENTER between LESLIE SCIENCE CENTER and LESLIE SCIENCE CENTER
LIBERTY PLAZA between LIBERTY PLAZA and LIBERTY PLAZA
LONG SHORE DR between AMHERST AVE and BARTON DR
LORRAINE ST between FERNWOOD AVE and LA SALLE DR
LOYOLA DR between CUL DE SAC and COLGATE CIR
MARSHALL ST between SPRINGBROOK AVE and VERLE AVE
MARY BETH DOYLE PARK between MARY BETH DOYLE PARK and MARY BETH DOYLE PARK
MARYFIELD DR between PINE RIDGE ST and WESTWOOD AVE
MARYFIELD WILDWOOD PARK between MARYFIELD WILDWOOD PARK and MARYFIELD WILDWOOD PARK
MEADOWSIDE DR between WOODCREEK BLVD and WOODCREEK BLVD
MEDFORD RD between MANCHESTER RD and ST FRANCIS DR
MEDFORD RD between NEEDHAM RD and MANCHESTER RD
MELROSE AVE between BELMONT RD and DEVONSHIRE RD
MERSHON DR between DELAWARE DR and SCIO CHURCH RD
MERSHON DR between HANOVER RD and SCIO CHURCH RD
MERSHON DR between HARTFORD ST and HANOVER RD
MERSHON DR between NORMANDY RD and GLEN LEVEN RD
MERSHON DR between SCIO CHURCH RD and DELAWARE DR
MILLER NATURE AREA between MILLER NATURE AREA and MILLER NATURE AREA
MINER ST between W SUMMIT ST and ELMCREST DR
MOREHEAD DR between NEWBURY CT and PICADILLY CIR
MORTON AVE between WOODSIDE RD and HARDING RD
MT PLEASANT AVE between SUNNYSIDE BLVD and W MADISON ST
N FOURTH AVE between E ANN ST and CATHERINE ST
N FOURTH AVE between E KINGSLEY ST and CATHERINE ST
N MAPLE RD between PAMELA AVE and HOLLYWOOD DR
N REVENA BLVD between LINWOOD AVE and HARBROOKE AVE
NOTTINGHAM RD between MANCHESTER RD and INDEPENDENCE BLVD
OLIVIA AVE between CAMBRIDGE RD and MINERVA RD
OLSON PARK between OLSON PARK and OLSON PARK
ORCHARD HILLS DR between CUL DE SAC and EVERGREEN PL
PARKWOOD AVE between JEANNE ST and FERNWOOD AVE
PEAR ST between APPLE ST and TRAVER ST
PILGRIM PARK between PILGRIM PARK and PILGRIM PARK
PLYMOUTH PARKWAY between PLYMOUTH PARKWAY and PLYMOUTH PARKWAY
POMONA RD between RED OAK RD and LOYOLA DR
REDEEMER AVE between HEWETT DR and RUSSELL RD
REDEEMER AVE between RUSSELL RD and RUSSETT RD
REDWOOD PARK between REDWOOD PARK and REDWOOD PARK
RIVERSIDE PARK between RIVERSIDE PARK and RIVERSIDE PARK
RUNNYMEDE BLVD between COVINGTON DR and SUE PKWY
S ASHLEY ST between W WASHINGTON ST and W HURON ST
S DIVISION ST between E WILLIAM ST and E LIBERTY ST
S FOREST AVE between GRANGER AVE and WELLS ST
S FOURTH AVE between E LIBERTY ST and E WASHINGTON ST
S FOURTH AVE between E MADISON ST and PACKARD ST
S FOURTH AVE between E WASHINGTON ST and E LIBERTY ST
S FOURTH AVE between PACKARD ST and E MADISON ST
S MAPLE RD between DICKEN DR and PAULINE BLVD
SCIO CHURCH RD between GREENVIEW DR and S SEVENTH ST
SECOND ST between W MOSLEY ST and W MADISON ST
SENECA AVE between OSWEGO ST and ONONDAGA ST
SEQUOIA PKWY between N MAPLE RD and PATRICIA AVE
SEQUOIA PKWY between PATRICIA AVE and N MAPLE RD
SHADFORD RD between FERDON RD and HARDING RD
SHADFORD RD between PACKARD ST and BALDWIN AVE
SHADFORD RD between WOODSIDE RD and HARDING RD
SHADOWOOD
DR between HEMLOCK DR and CHAMPAGNE DR
SIXTH ST between W MADISON ST and W JEFFERSON ST
SOUTHEAST AREA PARK between SOUTHEAST AREA PARK and SOUTHEAST AREA PARK
SPRING HOLLOW CT between CUL DE SAC and FOXWAY DR
SPRINGBROOK AVE between MARSHALL ST and SHARON DR
SUGARBUSH PARK between SUGARBUSH PARK and SUGARBUSH PARK
SYLVAN PARK between SYLVAN PARK and SYLVAN PARK
TACOMA CIR between KING GEORGE BLVD and KING GEORGE BLVD
THOMAS CT between SUSAN DR and THOMAS CT
TREMONT PL between WALDENWOOD DR and CUL DE SAC
TURNBERRY LN between MONUMENT DR and MONUMENT DR
VERLE AVE between DEAD END and EDDY ST
VERLE AVE between EDDY ST and PLATT RD
VERLE AVE between MARSHALL ST and DEAD END
VERLE AVE between MARSHALL ST and MARSHALL ST
VERLE AVE between PLATT RD and MARSHALL ST
VICTORIA AVE between RIDGE AVE and INDEPENDENCE BLVD
VIRNANKAY CIR between PAULINE BLVD and PAULINE BLVD
W DOBSON PL between CUL DE SAC and WOLVERHAMPTON LN
W JEFFERSON ST between SIXTH ST and FIFTH ST
W SUMMIT ST between GOTT ST and MINER ST
W WASHINGTON ST between S MAIN ST and S ASHLEY ST
WALDENWOOD DR between PENBERTON DR and TREMONT PL
WESTOVER AVE between RHEA ST and PORTER AVE
WHITE OAK DR between ENGLISH OAK DR and NEWPORT RD
WOODCREEK BLVD between CHALMERS DR and MEADOWSIDE DR
WOODCREEK BLVD between MEADOWSIDE DR and CHALMERS DR
WOODDALE CT between CUL DE SAC and WOODCREEK BLVD
WOODDALE CT between WOODCREEK BLVD and CUL DE SAC
YELLOWSTONE DR between YELLOWSTONE DR and BLUETT DR

Related articles

Expect the 2013 crop of juneberries to be a good one in Ann Arbor
Juneberry season is on its way – trees are in bloom

links for 2009-06-04

  • Buell's Mercantile Cypher (1860) appears on eve of the Civil War and near the end of the canal transport for which it provides language. Code compilation was still tentative at this time; its phraseology is practical but too specific and even politely long-winded, giving it the tone of an exercise book. The nature of the markings throughout the present copy suggest that it was used for preparation for another code, based on and incorporating some, and rejecting much else, of its content.
  • The codes did not appear out of nowhere. Their immediate tributaries were nautical and coastal signal systems (typically involving flaghoist combinations), and visual telegraphs such as the Chappé optical telegraph system that operated across France from the mid-1790s well into the 1840s. With all of these systems, each sign or combination of signs represented a word or phrase in a code dictionary.
  • It turned out that what I had instead was a commercial telegraphic code. From the 19th through the mid-20th centuries, telegrams were integral to business and personal communications. Telegraph codes proliferated as a way to correspond economically and privately. Readily available code books such as the ABC Universal Commercial Electric Telegraph Code, not to mention many others, were published, with many businesses creating in-house codes. According to telegraphy historian-enthusiast John McVey, “Thousands of codes were published or issued privately, but they are largely forgotten now. They present a finely-grained window into their respective domains and their time. And they provide instances of sometimes stunning visual, technical, lexicographic and unwitting poetic achievement.”
  • You might even call it “utopic” in Thomas More’s wry sense: a seemingly good or perfect place which is really no place at all. Computers displace us. They displace us physically – they enable us to talk to anyone, anywhere, and so forth – but they also displace us emotionally and intellectually. They confuse and distract us.
  • Logan's alternative is nimbly and seductively argued. He shows a map in which the distribution of early settled societies throughout the temperate zone appears exactly to coincide with the geographical spread of the 400-odd species of oak. He cites many cultures – in north America, ancient Mesopotamia, the highlands of Mexico – where a style of living midway between nomadic gathering and rooted agriculture was evident long before the advent of cereal farming. You could, I suppose, call it fixed foraging, the communal exploitation of a long-lived local resource. The resource was the oak tree, always there in one form or another – just above the waterline, if you were fisher-people, just below the uplands if you were hunters. And its first and most fundamental gift was the acorn, prolific, nutritious (you just needed to leach out the tannin with water), storable, cookable.
  • In my memory, I don’t think I liked the seasoned acorn jelly that much because of its bitter taste, but now I love it, it is like an adult appreciates good food more than a child. It has a slightly bitter taste from the acorn jelly and a slightly sweet and salty taste from the sauce, which I love, and this recipe is like that.
  • 1. From an early age I was taught what was good to eat in the north woods and how to find it. If you're walking with me and suddenly I dive into the bushes and come up with a handful of berries, you'll understand. Locally this means that the first day of blueberry, raspberry, juneberry, and strawberry season are holidays, and I employ a small army of berry-picking advance scouts to keep me informed of when opening day is and how conditions are.
  • When all are done, get out your food grinder. Put a fine knife on the grinder and run the shelled acorns through it. This makes a coarse meal. Place this in a large crock or glass bowl. Then add boiling water to cover and let stand an hour. Drain and throw away the brownish, unappetizing water. Repeat. Then taste the meal. It should have a bit of a bitter tang, then taste sweet as you chew a piece. Continue leaching out the tannin as long as necessary.
  • To get the tannic acid out of acorns, you need to leech them, that is stick them in boiling water for a few minutes, pour the water out, then repeat repeat repeat perhaps 25 times. Leeching is facilitated if you shell (obviously) the acorns and also chop them into fine pieces. Make sure to cut out any discolored or rotten portions of the nuts, and any grubs (unless you want to eat those too- I can vouch that they aren't poisonous but I don't know about the little cells that they build around themselves).
  • The reason I ask this: When I was a child, my grandfather had me pick up a small bucketful of acorns from under our pin oak tree. A day or two later, he asked me to come over to his house and he fed me acorns. The only problem I have is he never told anyone how in the world he prepared them.

    Here is some information about eating acorns or rather acorn meal. The tannins have to be removed to avoid the bitterness. I don't know what your grandfather might have done to remove the tannins in whole acorns unless the type of acorn had less tannins to begin with and could have been removed by soaking the whole acorn.

  • It’s a very complicated system. Oaks have “mast” cycles, which means that some years they produce tons of acorns and some years they produce few or none. Our oaks in Michigan do this as well. Mice eat acorns, and not surprisingly, in the New York study mouse numbers are linked to the mast cycles. More acorns, more white-footed mice.

  • My friend Katie told me about a recipe she found for making acorn cookies. I’ve been excited to try them and found a recipe and changed it a little last night. The kids and I shaped the acorns, dipped the tops in chocolate, and then rolled them in ground walnuts. I added some finely ground coffee beans in with the walnuts for a coffee/walnut sort of flavor. The kids preferred their cookies just dipped in chocolate. If you have a nut allergy or just don’t like nuts you could try crushed cookies or something similar.

Woody plants – identifying the trees of Michigan

Every year the U of Michigan teaches a Woody Plants class.  I didn't take it when I was in school, but my sister did, and it's one of these legendary courses that people remember for a long time.

Here's the links and notes I could find easily.  It's prompted by the Ann Arbor Chronicle's story about the city of Ann Arbor tree inventory going on now, which I hope will yield a precise map of where all of the public juneberry trees are.

Course listing: NRE 436: Woody Plants Biology and Identification

Woody
Plants is an intensive field- and lecture-based learning experience, in
which you will learn to identify 160 trees, shrub and vine species that
are important in Michigan environments. You will learn about their
taxonomy, distribution, habitat associations, and biogeographic history
and how to identify them in their leafless winter condition. The lab
component consists of weekly field trips in the Ann Arbor area, which
include riparian and floodplain habitats, glacial lakes, moraines,
bogs, fens and mesic forests. The lectures cover elementary aspects of
plant identification, taxonomy and ecology; however, the broader themes
include biogeographic history and the assembly of Michigan plant
communities, both before and after major glaciations, ecological
specializiation, and impacts of global warming and other anthropogenic
environmental changes.

Woody Plants – Sitemaker

The required textbook for Woody Plants is Michigan Trees
by Burt V. Barnes and Warren H. Wagner. The authors taught the Woody
Plants class from 1965 to 2005 and know their topic well. The books are
available at Shaman Drum bookshop on 311 State Street.

Burt Barnes home page at SNRE

Undergraduate and graduate teaching in forest ecology; landscape
ecology; natural history, and identification of Woody Plants. Research
focuses on the theory and application of the landscape ecosystem
approach. Studies emphasize spatial mapping of landscape ecosystems as
the basis for conserving and managing ecosystems at multiple scales.
Research on diversity of ecosystems and biota in upland, riverine, and
wetland ecosystems. Specific areas include genetic and systematic
studies of aspen species (genus Populus), worldwide and comparative studies of east Asian and North American forests and species of the temperate zone.

An early edition of Michigan Trees, in 1913, as seen on Google Books

Michigan Trees: A Handbook of the Native and Most Important Introduced Species
By Charles Herbert Otis
Edition: 2
Published by The Regents, 1913
Original from Harvard University
Digitized Apr 11, 2008
246 pages